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My collection of Jewish books

My collection of Jewish books

I was raised Jewish but not very religious so in the past few years I have been trying to learn more. I’m what you would call a secular Jew but very proud to be Jewish in every way.

I’ve always considered myself to be more spiritual than religious, hence the interest in Kabbalah. “Spiritual Principles” and “Inner Work” have been really great resources for simple explanations and basics of Ashlag Kabbalah (not in any way related to the Kabbalah Centre cult). Though reading “Jewish Meditation” some concepts were lost on me due to lack of general knowledge of Judaism so recently I’ve been pivoting to learn more on my own about Jewish rituals and prayer. My Jewish education was limited to the JCC when I was young, studying with a Reform chazzan for my Bar Mitzvah, Taglit, observing the “main” holidays with family (and occasionally attending services), and reading online resources.

I try to make the effort to at the very least sing a psalm a day and have been beginning to learn the daily prayers. I studied Biblical Hebrew for my bar mitzvah and a few months of Modern Hebrew in the past year so it has been slow but I am getting there as more words seem familiar.

“Our People” is a very interesting book, written by a Lithuanian historian alongside an Israeli historian. It was very controversial in Lithuania because it exposes the involvement of and examines the psyche of the Lithuanian collaborators who murdered their Jewish neighbors. The general attitude amongst the government of Lithuania is that the Soviets and the Germans are to blame for what happened to their Jews. I must admit I haven’t read much of it since I got to the part where it tells of the fate of my own family and their neighbors.

I’m open to any essential recommendations, or to give my opinions and recommendations on the books above. I know many of you probably have bookshelves full of books on Judaism.

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Source: Reditt